Forskjellige DSP og lydmodus

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  1. #1
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    Forskjellige DSP og lydmodus

    Finnes det en side som forklarer hva alle formatene "gjør" ? Jeg tenker da på eksempelvis: DTS Neo6, THX Ultra II mfl.

    Det står i de fleste manualer, men det hadde vært en idè å hatt en tråd her også.

  2. #2
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    Det står vel en del på de respektive hjemmesidene? DTS, dolby og evnt. THX?

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    Newcomer Orbitize sin avatar
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    Her er en liten oversikt over DTS-typer, og det burde ikke være vanskelig å navigere seg videre til f.eks THX

    Digital Theater System - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    Det står vel en del på de respektive hjemmesidene? DTS, dolby og evnt. THX?
    er er en liten oversikt over DTS-typer, og det burde ikke være vanskelig å navigere seg videre til f.eks THX
    Det er naturligvis ikke vanskelig å finne info på de respektive sidene, men det hadde vært greit å ha alt samlet på en plass

  5. #5
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    Kilde: Wikipedia


    DTS-ES
    (DTS Extended Surround): includes two variants, DTS-ES Matrix and DTS-ES Discrete 6.1, depending on how the sound was originally mastered and stored.[5] DTS-ES Discrete provides 6.1 discrete channels, with a discretely recorded (non-matrixed) center-surround channel; in home theater systems with a 7.1 configuration, the two rear-center speakers play in mono. DTS-ES Matrix provides 5.1 discrete channels with a matrixed center-surround audio channel. DTS-ES commonly works on a matrix system, whereby processors that are compatible with the ES codec look for and recognize "flags" built into the audio coding and "un-fold" the rear-center sound from data that would otherwise be sent to rear surround speakers. This is notated as DTS-ES 5.1. Less frequently, DTS-ES data can be encoded with a discrete sixth audio channel (the rear-center), meaning that the audio data for the sixth channel is stored separately from the other information, and is not embedded or matrixed among other channels. This is notated as DTS-ES 6.1, as the center rear is completely discrete from the other channels. ES capable processors can recognize the discrete sixth channel, and play it back if connected to the necessary speaker(s). In contrast, Dolby's competing EX codec, which also boasts a center rear channel, can only handle matrixed data and does not support a discrete sixth channel. DTS-ES is backward compatible with standard DTS setups, so non-ES equipment which does not recognize the flags or with ES enabled equipment that lack the extra speaker connections, sound plays back in 5.1 as if it were standard DTS. Only a few DVD titles have been released with DTS-ES Discrete.

    DTS NEO:6
    Neo:6, like Dolby's Pro Logic IIx system, can take stereo content and convert the sound into 5.1 or 6.1 channel format.

    DTS 96/24
    Allows the delivery of 5.1 channels of 24-bit, 96 kHz audio and high quality video on the DVD-Video format. Prior to the invention of DTS 96/24, it was only possible to deliver two channels of 24-bit, 96 kHz audio on DVD-Video. DTS 96/24 can also be placed in the video zone on DVD-Audio discs, making these discs playable on all existing DVD players.

    DTS-HD Master
    DTS-HD Master Audio: Previously known as DTS++ and DTS-HD, DTS-HD Master Audio supports a virtually unlimited number of surround sound channels, can downmix to 5.1 and two-channel, and can deliver audio quality at bit rates extending from DTS Digital Surround up to lossless (24-bit, 96 kHz). DTS-HD Master Audio is selected as an optional surround sound format for Blu-ray and HD DVD. However, currently only the Japanese version Pioneer BDP-LX80 supports bitstream digital output (not decode) of the format [citation needed], while all Blu-ray and HD DVD players can decode the DTS "core" resolution soundtrack at 1.5 Mbit/s. DTS-HD Master Audio and Dolby TrueHD are the only technologies that deliver compressed lossless surround sound for these new disc formats, ensuring the highest quality audio performance available in the new standards. (N.B.: DTS Coherent Acoustics coding system has been selected as mandatory audio technology for both the Blu-ray Disc (BD) and High Definition Digital Versatile Disc (HD DVD).[6])

    DTS-HD High Resolution Audio
    Like DTS-HD Master Audio, DTS-HD High Resolution audio is an extension to the original DTS audio format. It delivers up to 7.1 channels of sound at 96 kHz sampling frequency and 24 bit depth resolution. DTS-HD High Resolution Audio is selected as an optional surround sound format for Blu-ray Disc and HD DVD with constant bit rates up to respectively 6.0 Mbit/s and 3.0 Mbit/s. It is supposed to be an alternative for DTS-HD Master Audio where disc space may not allow it.

    DTS Connect
    This is a function pack available on the computer platform only. It is found on soundcards with CMedia CMI8788/CMI8770 Soundcontroller.

    DTS Interactive
    This is a realtime DTS stream encoder. It is a part of DTS Connect, or can found on stand alone devices (e.g., Surround Encoder, HD DVD / Blu-ray Player). Nearly a dozen titles on the PlayStation 2 feature the "DTS Interactive" realtime stream encoder, such as Grand Theft Auto: Vice City, and Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines.

    DTS Virtual
    A relatively new development. Intended for use in conjunction with a Dolby Headphone processor. It allows a virtual (as the name suggests) 5.1 surround sound to be heard through a standard pair of headphones. It provides a better spatial awareness than Dolby Headphone on its own.

    Dolby Digital
    , or AC-3, is the common version containing up to six discrete channels of sound, with five channels for normal-range speakers (20 Hz – 20,000 Hz) (Right front, Center, Left Front, Right Rear and Left Rear) and one channel (20 Hz – 120 Hz) for the subwoofer driven low frequency effects. mono and stereo modes are supported, as well. AC-3 supports audio sample-rates up to 48KHz. Batman Returns was the first film to use the Dolby Digital technology when it premiered in theaters in Summer 1992. The LaserDisc version of Clear and Present Danger featured the very first Home Theater Dolby Digital mix in 1995.

    Dolby Digital EX
    Dolby Digital EX is similar in practice to Dolby's earlier Pro-Logic format, which utilized Matrix technology to add a center and single rear surround channel to stereo soundtracks. EX adds an extension to the standard 5.1 channel Dolby Digital codec in the form of matrixed rear channels, creating 6.1 or 7.1 channel output. However, the format is not considered a true 6.1 or 7.1 channel codec because it lacks the capability to support a discrete 6th channel unlike the competing DTS-ES codec.

    Dolby Digital Live
    Dolby Digital Live (DDL) is a real-time encoding technology for interactive media such as video games. It converts any audio signals on a PC or game console into the 5.1-channel Dolby Digital format and transports it via a single S/PDIF cable.[1] The SoundStorm, used for the Xbox game console and certain nForce2-based PCs, used an early form of this technology. Dolby Digital Live is currently available in sound cards from manufacturers such as Turtle Beach[2] and Auzentech[3] using C-Media chipsets, as well as on motherboards with codecs such as Realtek's ALC882D,[4] ALC888DD and ALC888H. A similar technology known as DTS Connect is available from competitor DTS. An important benefit of this technology is that it enables the use of digital multichannel sound with consumer sound cards, which are otherwise limited to PCM stereo or multichannel analog.

    Dolby Digital Surround EX
    Dolby Digital Surround EX was co-developed by Dolby and Lucasfilm THX in time for the release in May 1999 of Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. It provides an economical and backwards-compatible means for 5.1 soundtracks to carry a sixth, center back surround channel for improved localization of effects. The extra surround channel is matrix encoded onto the discrete Left Surround and Right Surround channels of the 5.1 mix, much like the front center channel on Dolby Surround encoded stereo soundtracks. The result can be played without loss of information on standard 5.1 systems, or played in 6.1 or 7.1 on systems equipped with Surround EX decoding and additional speakers. Dolby Digital Surround EX has since been used for the Star Wars prequels on the DVD versions and also the remastered original Star Wars trilogy. A number of DVDs have Dolby Digital Surround EX audio option.

    Dolby Digital Plus
    E-AC-3, more commonly known as Dolby Digital Plus, is an enhanced coding system based on the AC-3 codec. It offers increased bitrates (up to 6.144 Mbit/s), support for more audio channels (up to 13.1), improved coding techniques to reduce compression artifacts, and backward compatibility with existing AC-3 hardware.

    Dolby TrueHD
    Dolby TrueHD, developed by Dolby Laboratories, is an advanced lossless audio codec based on Meridian Lossless Packing. Support for the codec is mandatory for HD DVD and optional for Blu-ray Disc hardware. TrueHD supports 24 bit, 96 kHz audio channels at up to 18 Mbit/s over 8 channels (although HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc standards currently limit their maximum number of audio channels to eight, Dolby TrueHD can output up to 14 sound channels simultaneously). It also supports extensive metadata, including dialog normalization and Dynamic Range Control.

  6. #6
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    Veldig bra info, Tiger !

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