Hva er frekvensen til en bassgitar?

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  1. #1
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    Hva er frekvensen til en bassgitar?

    Dette har jeg lurt på lenge;

    Hvilken frekvenser ca. spiller en bassgitar?

    Enn basstromme, trommer, cymbal?

  2. #2
    Expert Flageborg sin avatar
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    Drum Frequencies

    The pitch of a note is almost entirely determined by the frequency: high frequency for high pitch and low for low. For example, 110 vibrations per second (110 Hz) is the frequency of vibration of the A string on a guitar. The A above that (second fret on the G string) is 220 Hz. The next A (5th fret on top E string) is 440 Hz, which is the orchestral tuning A. (The guitar A string plays the A normally written at the bottom of the bass clef. In guitar music, however, it is normally written an octave higher.) We can hear sounds from about 15 Hz to 20 kHz (1 kHz = 1000 Hz). The lowest note on the standard guitar is E at about 83 Hz, but a bass guitar can play down to 41 Hz. The orginary guitar can play notes with fundamental frequencies above 1 kHz. Human ears are most sensitive to sounds between 1 and 4 kHz - about two to four octaves above middle C. Although the fundamental frequency of the guitar notes do not usually go up into this range, the instrument does output acoustic power in this range, in the higher harmonics of the most of its notes.It is obvious that most instruments like the guitar, having the highest string on the last fret played, represents a frequency equally significant to the harmonic content of the lowest string (E) played open. The highest note playable on a 24 fret guitar is a (D octave 7) note. This has a fundamental frequency of 1175 Hz. If you played the lowest frequency string of a guitar (E octave 3) at 82 Hz, you would find that the setting of an equalizerat the 1175 Hz would dramatically alter the sound of the low note, especially with bright new strings. 1175 Hz is just below the 4th octave of the 82 Hz E string. In summary, the frequency equalization settings that affect the quality and shape of an instrument's sound far surpass the fundamental or tuning pitches of the instrument.

  3. #3
    Expert Flageborg sin avatar
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    Bass "Kick" Drum

    It is hardly ever effective to boost frequencies of a kick drum below about 60 Hz. There are applications on some modern dance music where synthesized drum patches will have dominant energy below 50 Hz. These 20 to 40 Hz fundamentals are the type that easily propagates through the closed windows of automobiles and other structures. These low frequency waves encounter little acoustical attenuation in materials and may be heard from great distances. For the generalized kick drum application, the "thump" is usually realized in the 60

    Hz to 100 Hz range. The definition or "slap" of the kick drum is very essential for its relationship to the bass guitar. Boosting the kick drum at 60 to 100 Hz for the "thump" and boosting 1.5 kHz to 3 kHz for the "slap" will provide a "spectral saddle" for the bass guitar to reside. Boosting bass drum frequencies from 100 Hz to 2 kHz in excess will often cause the kick drum and bass guitar relationship to be very boomy and muddy. Letting the kick drum initial attack in the 1.5 kHz to 3 kHz region start off the event, and letting the bass guitar fresh string harmonics provide the sustaining clarity, provide a pleasing spectral combination.


  4. #4
    Expert Flageborg sin avatar
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    Snare Drum

    Older audio references will refer to snare drum dominant frequencies being in the 1 kHz to 2 kHz region. If you are mixing sound for modern rock or country music you will find a potpourri of snare drum frequencies. Starting with disco in the 70's and the urban cowboy country craze of the early 80's, snare drum became spectrally similar with a bass drum. Experiment with a multi-octave equalizer on a stereo system with an early to mid 1980's country record, like George Strait. You will find very dominant snare drum spectral content in the 150 to 200 Hz region. Mixes of that era as well as today use caution in not having the snare and the kick drum both being dominant in the mix since it would be difficult to tell the difference between the two drums. This often results in a "double time" effect. There are no general rules to the equalization of the snare drum with one exception. When using a real snare with a microphone, be aware that if the drum is tuned very high like a marching band snare, excessive low frequency boosts will not create a fat snare. Listen to the real drum sound up close and realize that fundamental frequencies that are not available from the drum cannot be created or synthesized by equalization. Excessive boost at low frequencies will cause pickup of other drums undesirably.Generally, if a trigger snare patch or drum has energy in the 150 Hz range and you desire a fat snare, then use it accordingly. Some crisp quality can be added in the 2 kHz to 5 kHz region. Remember however that excessive boosting of any frequency of a snare drum means you are probably trying to get a sound that is not available from the source and you are likely picking up extraneous sounds from other nearby sources. Snare drum reverb is a diverse topic alone. The reverb usage will greatly affect overall equalization used.

    Toms

    Depending on the tuning of the toms, most of the effective range is from 150 Hz to 2 kHz. The lows are good for deep percussive effects but definition that cuts through the mix is usually about 1 kHz to 3 kHz. One advantage of toms particularly in a country or contemporary mix is that they are only played occasionally. That means their level and occupancy of spectral space may be loud and wide. They don't need to repetitively compete with other instruments like kick drum and bass guitar. The application of reverb also effects equalization as mentioned in the snare drum topic.

    Cymbals

    Fortunately, cymbals remain fairly constant and predictable over many types of music. Their dominant energy lies in the 2 kHz to 5 kHz region. Cymbal harmonics extend up to and past the range of human hearing. Boosting of cymbals in the 10 kHz to 12 kHz region results in a very brittle sound. Usually, boosts in the dominant area of 2 kHz to 3 kHz makes the overall mix less "wet" or "noisy" than boosting in the upper region.

    Electric Bass

    As with the discussion of drums, boosting lower frequencies to try to create more depth than what is available is a common mistake. Most bass guitar energy lies around 100 Hz with definition in the 1 kHz to 2 kHz region. Boosting of very low frequencies will result in a "muddy" clash with the kick drum. Letting the kick drum make the fundamental, and the bass guitar rounding out the low midrange just above the kick drum results in a more clear discernible mix. The kick drum can have high definition attack for the initial hit while the bass guitar string harmonics can provide the sustaining definition for the sound.

    Electric Lead or Steel Guitar

    The most important rule for equalizing guitars is to realize that harmonic series content not available at the source cannot be generated or synthesized at he mixer. Most guitar and steel guitar energy lie between 80 Hz and 5 kHz. Boosting the 3 to 5 kHz range will add clarity to clean guitars but will sometimes add harsh harmonics to a distorted guitar.


    Acoustic Guitar

    The same frequency range applies to the acoustic guitar as the lead electric guitar. One common mistake is to listen to the acoustic guitar too much by itself rather that with the entire band. One common mistake with the solo acoustic guitar is to add too much bass. A solo acoustic guitar seems to need more low frequency boost to round out the sound than it does when played with a set of other instruments. If the low frequencies are excessively boosted, this results in a very muddy relationship with the overall mix. Remember that the acoustic rhythm guitar is as much a percussive timing component as a melodic component. Its high frequency spectrum is most essential to the "sizzle" of the program material.

  5. #5
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    tusen takk

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    Intermediate killroy sin avatar
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    Veldig mye nynorsk, men uansett leselig og forståelig.
    De "dype" bass riffa vi hører på PA anlegg / konserter er altså ikke veldig lave ( forståerlig nok), men selvsagt med masse energi !

    /L

  7. #7
    Intermediate klovnikamp sin avatar
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    Bra info, dette er med laveste hz på bassgitar har jeg også lurt på

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