Hvilken HTPC skal jeg bygge? - Side 2

Sponsorer:
Takk Takk:  0
Like Like:  0

Vis meningsmålingsresultat:

Velgere
0. Du kan ikke stemme i denne meningsmålingen
  • 0 0%
Side 2 av 2 FørsteFørste 1 2
Viser resultater 21 til 30 av 30
  1. #21
    Active
    Medlem siden
    Apr 2003
    Poster
    498
    Takk & like
    Nevnt
    0 post(er)
    AVtorget feedback
    0
    (0% positive tilbakemeldinger)
    Seasonic som nevnes av andre her har både 330- og 380-watts PSU'er. En av disse hadde sikkert passet bra. TV-kort o.l. bruker ikke all verden av strøm - ikke uten grunn at det ikke er kjøling på de.

  2. #22
    Intermediate
    Medlem siden
    Oct 2003
    Poster
    4,886
    Takk & like
    Nevnt
    0 post(er)
    AVtorget feedback
    0
    (0% positive tilbakemeldinger)
    Sitat Opprinnelig postet av thunderstorm77
    Bør jeg gå ned fra 500W til f.ex. 300W på strømforsyning? Jeg kommer til å sette inn en del tilleggskort etterhvert, bl.a. TV-kort og lydkort.
    Veldig mange entusiaster "tror" at man trenger fryktelig mange watt fordi det gir mer stabile systemer. Det er tilbakevist av utallige tester men myten holder seg.

    http://www.silentpcreview.com/article28-page3.html

    "HOW MUCH POWER IS ENOUGH?

    300W models have replaced 230W and 250W models as baseline units since the introduction of the AMD Athlon. They feature a fan (or two) rated for 35~40 cubic feet per minute (CFM) airflow. Presumably, this level of airflow is required for adequate cooling at full power output to pass safety approvals under UL, CSA, CE and other regulations. In early 2005, retail PSU models rated for increasingly higher power, as much >600W, are being introduced by many brands.

    Our own experience indicates that despite all the new power hungry components such as >75W video cards and >120W CPUs, it is still rare to find a desktop computer than draws much more than 200W DC under typical demanding applications. Around 300W DC looks to be about the highest power draw from a single CPU full-bore high end system at this time (Feb 2005). Although some headroom is always good to have, there seems little question that consumers are being persuaded to pay for power capacity that is never used. One of the nasty side effects is the fan noise of the high airflow required to keep the PSU adequately cooled when delivering maximum power. High speed fans generally make more noise than slower ones even when they are slowed by undervolting.

    Why this state of affairs exists is a matter of marketing and technical obfuscation, probably more by accident than any massive conspiracy. With relatively low current requirements prior to the AMD Athlon processor, the aforementioned 230W and 250W were perfectly adequate for PC systems, even if the power supplies didn't deliver full rated performance. That changed with the Athlon and then the P4. PSU makers were quick to introduce higher rated models said to be required for the new power hungry processors. It was a good marketing opportunity. Rather than "Our 250W PSU is better than theirs," it is easier to sell the message "Our 300W PSU is better than their 250W PSU." Bigger is always better, isn't it? It also allowed higher prices to be charged.

    A counterpoint is AMD's system builder's guide, which suggests higher numbers: up to ~180W DC for a typical system and ~250W DC for a high performance system, but these numbers are obtained by adding the maximum power rating for each component, then taking 20% off to account for real-world conditions. It is almost impossible for any application to demand 80% of maximum power draw from each component simultaneously. Intel's PSU recommendations are similar.

    Suffice it to say that as manufacturers, both AMD and Intel are looking at worst-case secenarios. As custom builders, enthusiasts and system integrators can make choices based on real needs and applications.

    Even so, Is Higher Power Better?

    Without getting into technical details, the nature of a switching power supply is that it delivers as much power as is demanded by the components. This means that when installed in a PC whose components require 200W, a 400W PSU and a 250W PSU will each deliver 200W. Does this mean the 400W is coasting while the 250W is struggling? Not if they are both rated honestly and if they have the same efficiency. If one has lower efficiency than the other, then it will consume more AC to deliver the same power to the components, and in the process, generate more heat within itself. As long as there is adequate power, higher efficiency is the key to cooler, quieter PSU operation.

    The main benefit of higher power PSUs is when the airflow in the PSU is deliberately set very low in order to minimize noise. This usually means the PSU components will run hotter. If all other things are equal, a higher rated PSU may be a better choice in such an application because its parts are generally rated for higher current and heat than a lower rated model.

    What are the Key Aspects to Good PSU Performance?

    There is a great deal of fuzzy and unclear thinking about what constitutes a good power supply. The obsfucation caused by competitive marketing is certainly one cause of this confusion. Another is the proliferation of computer hardware web sites that publish "reviews" of PSUs without much notion of what should be examined or how or why.

    These parameters are the keys to good PSU performance:
    Stable power delivery under load
    High efficiency
    Good cooling
    Low noise operation
    Long term reliability

    The truth is that a computer power supply is a complex electronic device with a complex role that is little appreciated by most hardware reviewers. Most system integrators don't really appreciate it either, either. This is due partly to the assemble-and-sell nature of the PC industry, where manufacturers build components in accordance to an accepted standard specification for "universal" compatibility with other components. Such piecemeal component manufacturing does not nurture or reward system thinking, which has been much more the norm for Apple."

    -k

  3. #23
    Intermediate
    Medlem siden
    Oct 2003
    Poster
    4,886
    Takk & like
    Nevnt
    0 post(er)
    AVtorget feedback
    0
    (0% positive tilbakemeldinger)
    http://www.silentpcreview.com/article28-page4.html

    REAL SYSTEM POWER REQUIREMENTS
    System Total Power Draw
    State AC Input DC Output

    A: Low P4
    Intel Pentium 4-2.8C
    AOpen MX4SGI-4DL2 motherboard
    2 x 512 mb OCZ PC3700 DDRAM
    Seagate 7200.7 120G HDD
    Seagate Barracuda IV 40G HDD
    Matrox P650 VGA (dual head mode)
    Seasonic Super Tornado 350W PSU
    Asus QuieTrack CDRW
    6-in-1 card reader / floppy drive
    3 low speed fans idle 71W 54W
    Folding @ Home 115W
    92W
    PCMark04 126W
    102W

    B: High A64
    Athlon A64-3800+ (130nm core)
    Soltek SL-K8TPro-939 motherboard
    4 x 512 mb OCZ PC4000 DDRAM
    ATI 9800-256 Pro VGA
    Hitachi 7K400 HDD (400gb)
    Samsung P160 HDD
    Silverstone ST30NF PSU (fanless)
    M-Audio Firewire 410 external firewire-driven sound card
    low speed 80mm fan idle 99W 76W
    Folding @ Home 126W
    102W
    PCMark04 184W
    147W

    C: Mid P4
    Intel Pentium 4-3.2 (Northwood)
    Intel D875PBZLK motherboard
    2 x 256MB HyperX DDR400 PC3200
    ATI Radeon 9800XT 256MB DDR
    16x Sony DVD-RW
    Zalman 400W PSU
    Samsung HDDs
    Creative SB Audigy-2 ZS Platinum
    2 x 120mm fans and 1 80mm fan idle 127W 94W
    Folding @ Home 194W
    146W
    PCMark04 236W
    180W

    D: High P4
    Intel Pentium 670 (Prescott, 3.8GHz)
    Intel D915PBL motherboard
    2 x 512MB Corsair DDR2 RAM
    AOpen Aeolus 6800GT PCIe VGA
    2 x 250 GB Western Digital Caviar SE HDD
    Seasonic S12-430W PSU
    Creative SB Audigy-2 ZS Platinum
    3 x 120mm fans idle 141W 109W
    Folding @ Home 214W
    168W
    PCMark04 264W
    214W


    "High end" maskina de har målt, en intel P4 prescott 3.8GHz som vel er noe av det varmeste som noen gang er produsert trakk altså maksimalt 214W ut av strømforsyninga når man kjørte hard 3d-testing slik at både prosessor og grafikk-kort jobbet for fullt.

    Hvis du skal ha en HTPC-løsning med Core 2 som ikke skal brukes til hardcore spilling så vil du sannsynligvis bryke betydelig MINDRE effekt enn dette...

    -k

  4. #24
    Intermediate
    Medlem siden
    Oct 2003
    Poster
    4,886
    Takk & like
    Nevnt
    0 post(er)
    AVtorget feedback
    0
    (0% positive tilbakemeldinger)
    Med mindre man kjører dual core dual chip CPU og dual skjermkort, stort RAID-oppsett etc samtidig så ser jeg ingen grunn til å velge noe annet enn Seasonic s12 330W PSU. Noen er veldig glad i MIST sine så det er greit det også.

    -k

  5. #25
    Intermediate
    Medlem siden
    Oct 2005
    Poster
    784
    Takk & like
    Nevnt
    0 post(er)
    AVtorget feedback
    0
    (0% positive tilbakemeldinger)
    Sitat Opprinnelig postet av thunderstorm77
    Bør jeg gå ned fra 500W til f.ex. 300W på strømforsyning? Jeg kommer til å sette inn en del tilleggskort etterhvert, bl.a. TV-kort og lydkort.
    Vel, det kommer litt an på 300W-modellen, men jeg ville nok egentlig anbefalt å noe større. Core 2 Duo bruker ikke så mye strøm som Pentium 4 og Pentium D, men er i praksis ikke spesielt ulik Athlon 64 X2. En høyt belastet 300W kan raskt utvikle en god del mer støy -- en passiv 300W under høy belastning vil kunne utvikle mye varme.

    Et element er jo også at skal man ha et middels kraftig grafikkort, vil dette under belastning også trekke en del.

    Et tips ellers gitt av flere er jo Seasonic S12 -- denne får du bl.a. i en 430W-versjon. Du finner en ganske bra test av strømforsyninger her som inkl. MIST 500W og Seasonic S12 500W: http://www.sweclockers.com/articles_...?id=570&page=1

    Merk her: MIST = Cooltek. Årsaken til at denne selges under Cooltek-navnet i div. land er at MIST ikke er et helt heldig navnevalg i Tyskland... (sjekk tysk-ordbok...).

  6. #26
    Intermediate thunderstorm77 sin avatar
    Medlem siden
    May 2005
    Poster
    677
    Takk & like
    Nevnt
    0 post(er)
    AVtorget feedback
    0
    (0% positive tilbakemeldinger)
    Da regner jeg med at Seasonic S12 380W er et godt valg. Billig er den og.

    http://prisguide.hardware.no/product...roductId=41163

    Er det en stor fordel at Mist har mulighet til å ikke koble på kabler som ikke brukes? Kan vel være greit i en HTPC med liten plass?

  7. #27
    Intermediate
    Medlem siden
    Oct 2005
    Poster
    784
    Takk & like
    Nevnt
    0 post(er)
    AVtorget feedback
    0
    (0% positive tilbakemeldinger)
    Sitat Opprinnelig postet av knutinh

    "High end" maskina de har målt, en intel P4 prescott 3.8GHz som vel er noe av det varmeste som noen gang er produsert trakk altså maksimalt 214W ut av strømforsyninga når man kjørte hard 3d-testing slik at både prosessor og grafikk-kort jobbet for fullt.

    Hvis du skal ha en HTPC-løsning med Core 2 som ikke skal brukes til hardcore spilling så vil du sannsynligvis bryke betydelig MINDRE effekt enn dette...

    -k
    Poenget er egentlig ikke effekten, men at det anbefales strømforsyninger kjent for å være veldig stillegående. Jeg er helt enig med at mange nok kjøper større strømforsyninger enn de strengt tatt trenger.

    Antallet watt varme som produseres under høy belastning trenger heller ikke være relevant sett i henhold til støynivå. En god PSU kan tåle å operere under høyere temperatur, så egentlig betyr ikke mer overskuddsvarme at det er høyere støynivå. Kvaliteten/design på viften blir også et element, ikke bare rotasjonshastigheten for den.

    Det skal ellers nevnes at PCMark04-testen ikke er den beste i denne sammenheng synes jeg. Jeg har en mistanke om at den har litt lite prosessorforbruk slik at grafikkortet blir det mer avgjørende.

    Et annet element er hvordan belastningen er fordelt og hvordan spesifikasjonene for PSUen er satt opp. En del PSUer kan ha en rateing der 3.3V og 5V utgjør en temmelig stor del av totaleffekten, men strengt tatt er det det meste av belastningen på 12V. Videre har man i dag gjerne to eller flere 12V-linjer med separat maksimalbelastning. Altså skal det egentlig ganske mye til for å totalt utnytte potensialet til en strømforsyning hvis man ser på ratet totaleffekt i praksis.

    Det som kan bli viktig å se på er combined-effekt (selv om man riktignok ikke har all verden av belastning på 3.3V og 5V) og 12V-effekt alene. F.eks. kan det være at godt over 100W av det oppgitt for en 300W er på 3.3 og 5V.

  8. #28
    Intermediate
    Medlem siden
    Oct 2003
    Poster
    4,886
    Takk & like
    Nevnt
    0 post(er)
    AVtorget feedback
    0
    (0% positive tilbakemeldinger)
    Sitat Opprinnelig postet av clasm
    Poenget er egentlig ikke effekten, men at det anbefales strømforsyninger kjent for å være veldig stillegående. Jeg er helt enig med at mange nok kjøper større strømforsyninger enn de strengt tatt trenger.

    Antallet watt varme som produseres under høy belastning trenger heller ikke være relevant sett i henhold til støynivå. En god PSU kan tåle å operere under høyere temperatur, så egentlig betyr ikke mer overskuddsvarme at det er høyere støynivå. Kvaliteten/design på viften blir også et element, ikke bare rotasjonshastigheten for den.

    Det skal ellers nevnes at PCMark04-testen ikke er den beste i denne sammenheng synes jeg. Jeg har en mistanke om at den har litt lite prosessorforbruk slik at grafikkortet blir det mer avgjørende.

    Et annet element er hvordan belastningen er fordelt og hvordan spesifikasjonene for PSUen er satt opp. En del PSUer kan ha en rateing der 3.3V og 5V utgjør en temmelig stor del av totaleffekten, men strengt tatt er det det meste av belastningen på 12V. Videre har man i dag gjerne to eller flere 12V-linjer med separat maksimalbelastning. Altså skal det egentlig ganske mye til for å totalt utnytte potensialet til en strømforsyning hvis man ser på ratet totaleffekt i praksis.

    Det som kan bli viktig å se på er combined-effekt (selv om man riktignok ikke har all verden av belastning på 3.3V og 5V) og 12V-effekt alene. F.eks. kan det være at godt over 100W av det oppgitt for en 300W er på 3.3 og 5V.
    Hvis du leser artikkelen så mener jeg at den behandler problematikken rundt separate linjer.

    Spcr tester PSU-er ved forskjellige belastinger mhp støy (støynivå og lyklipp), effektivitet og spenningsfall. Jeg ser ikke at vi som bruker har behov for annen informasjon enn det.

    Mitt subjektive inntrykk er at mange PSU-er har et optimalt arbeidspunkt ved kanskje 2/3 eller 3/4 av maksimal oppgitt effekt, hvor effektiviteten er best. Det vil si at forholdet mellom effekt inn i strømforsyningen og ut av strømforsyningen er best mulig. Utenfor dette området faller effektiviteten av slik at en 600W strømforsyning er svært ineffektiv ved 50 Watt belastning.

    Seasonic har hele veien fått skryt for lav-støy vifteløsninger og en spesiell (ikke-lineær) tilbakekobling mellom temperatursensor og vifteturtall som gjør at man slipper "passe bråkete" PSU ved lav belastning.

    Med mindre man skal ha en helt spesiell server med flere skjermkort, 2x intel prescott prosessorer og 10-talls disker så ser jeg ikke noen grunn til å bestride funnene til de som har jobbet med testing av dette i mange år.

    For "folk flest" som ikke ønsker å lære seg alle begrepene og analysere seg ihjel finnes det nå gode, rimelige, effektive og lav-støy strømforsyninger. Å la seg lure av hjemmemekkere til å kjøpe rådyre 600W strømforsyninger er da uheldig.

    -k

  9. #29
    Intermediate
    Medlem siden
    Oct 2005
    Poster
    784
    Takk & like
    Nevnt
    0 post(er)
    AVtorget feedback
    0
    (0% positive tilbakemeldinger)
    Sitat Opprinnelig postet av knutinh
    Seasonic har hele veien fått skryt for lav-støy vifteløsninger og en spesiell (ikke-lineær) tilbakekobling mellom temperatursensor og vifteturtall som gjør at man slipper "passe bråkete" PSU ved lav belastning.
    Ut i fra det jeg har forstått, er det to litt forskjellige design i S12-linjen. Personlig har jeg kun erfaring med 500W-modellen.

    Selv om effektiviteten kan være den samme på lave belastinger, kan det være at den kraftigere PSU kan holde lavere turtall på høyere belastning/høy temperatur pga. den er konstruert slik at den skal kunne tåle høyere belastninger.

    Forskjellen mellom en 300W og en 500W kan i noen tilfelle være komponentkvalitet/design i forhold til det termiske, slik at effektiviteten kan være lik. Et element blir også hvordan effektiviteten påvirkes av temperatur.

    For "folk flest" som ikke ønsker å lære seg alle begrepene og analysere seg ihjel finnes det nå gode, rimelige, effektive og lav-støy strømforsyninger. Å la seg lure av hjemmemekkere til å kjøpe rådyre 600W strømforsyninger er da uheldig.
    Helt enig. Spesielt siden omtrent alt av 600W+ PSUer har fire 12V-linjer og følger EPS-standarden kan det faktisk være vanskelig å få utnyttet effekten. Man kan lett ende på å all 12V-belastning går på to av linjene. Her er MIST 600W ganske smart, ettersom man kan kabelkonfigurere den slik at den ikke følger standarden.

    F.eks. hvis man ikke har EPS vil jo linjen som går til denne i basis stå ubrukt. Standardene ellers i dag er at det ikke skal være over 20A på 12V-linjene.

  10. #30
    Intermediate
    Medlem siden
    Oct 2003
    Poster
    4,886
    Takk & like
    Nevnt
    0 post(er)
    AVtorget feedback
    0
    (0% positive tilbakemeldinger)
    Sitat Opprinnelig postet av clasm
    Selv om effektiviteten kan være den samme på lave belastinger, kan det være at den kraftigere PSU kan holde lavere turtall på høyere belastning/høy temperatur pga. den er konstruert slik at den skal kunne tåle høyere belastninger.
    Det kan like gjerne være slik at "store" modeller har vifte beregnet på høy hastighet (for å kunne svelge unna varmen fra den høyere effekten). Det er en kjent sak at også vifter har optimale turtall, og en vifte beregnet på lave hastigheter støyer mindre for en gitt, lav luftflow enn en større vifte kjørt på veldig lav spenning.

    Dessuten har ofte PSUer en terskel for nedre viftehastighet. Sannsynligvis for å hindre problemer med stopp/start. Det betyr at når man normalt antar et lineært (eller i det minste monotont) forhold mellom effektuttak og støy, så vil en slik konstruksjon ha samme støy uansett hvor lite effekt du tar ut for lave effektuttak.

    -k

Side 2 av 2 FørsteFørste 1 2

Stikkord for denne tråden

Regler for innlegg

  • Du kan ikke starte nye tråder
  • Du kan ikke svare på innlegg / tråder
  • Du kan ikke laste opp vedlegg
  • Du kan ikke redigere meldingene dine
  •